Summer Azure

Place name abbreviations: MPEA - Middle Patuxent Environment Area; PRSP - Patuxent River State Park; PVSP - Patapsco River Valley State Park.

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Click on the common name to obtain additional information from the Butterflies and Moths of North America web page. BugGuide is another web resource.

Legend:

Common name [Link is to BAMONA] (wingspan range in inches) Occurrence level & flight period.
Habitat. Typically visits (for nectaring). Larval host plants.




Summer Azure (0.9–1.2") Common: L-May thru E-Oct Woods trails & edges Mud puddles Viburnum, wingstem
Summer Azure

Spring brood
April 10, 2014
David Force WMA
Linda Hunt

Summer Azure

Female
April 19, 2015
Western Regional Park
Annette Allor

Summer Azure

June 8, 2014
Rockburn Branch Park
Annette Allor

Summer Azure

June 15, 2012
Mount Pleasant
Bonnie Ott

Summer Azure

June 25, 2011
Avalon (PVSP)
Richard Orr

Spring Azure

Female
April 26, 2013
Waterloo Park
Linda Hunt

Spring Azure

Female
April 26, 2013
Waterloo Park
Linda Hunt

Summer Azure

Female
May 30, 2014
Columbia
Linda Hunt

Summer Azure

July 15, 2010
Ellicott City
Kathy Litzinger

Summer Azure

September 1, 2001
Howard Chapel Road (PRSP)
Wes Earp

Multiple broods

How to you distinguish a Spring Azure from a spring form Summer Azure?

According to Harry Pavulaan, the Azure expert, the Spring Azures are a more violet-blue above, the spring form Summer Azures a more azure-blue. However, since they both always perch with their wings closed, you can only tell the shade of blue while they are flying—which is not so easy to photograph. They can both be flying at the same time in the spring. Spring Azures use Flowering Dogwood and Wild Black Cherry for larval host; Summer Azures use other dogwood species, viburnums, and even sumacs. Thus, the technique would be to find a place with some Flowering Dogwoods (or Wild Black Cherry), a lot of Azure species flying around, and then look for representatives with a darker blue shade while it is flying. If you want a picture, then snap one of a specimen after it has perched and that appeared violet blue while it was flying. (I never said this was easy...)—Dick Smith